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2015

Two Video Works by John Sturgeon
Archivist (2010)

Archivist (2010)

Monday, May 4, 2015 | 6:00 – 7:00 PM 
PAHB 132

This event marked the inaugural CIRCA Presents event.

UMBC Professor John Sturgeon of Visual Arts debuted his video with which we sleep (2015), and presented ARCHIVIST: cleaving among the houses (2010), both produced and directed by the artist. John Sturgeon engaged the audience in conversation around these two works, which served as a capstone to his career at UMBC.

John Sturgeon is a digital media artist-poet, practicing in video, installation, performance and interactive forms, with interests in tele-performative and streaming media collaborations. For over four decades, Sturgeon has exhibited, screened and lectured about his work both nationally and internationally, including solo commissions at The Museum of Modern Art, NY and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. His work is represented in the collections of major museums worldwide, with a history of awards and fellowships including a Guggenheim Fellowship, several NEA Individual and Media Arts awards and two Fulbright Scholar appointments – most recently serving as: US-UK Fulbright Scholar 2012-13, University of the Arts London.

Image Lynn Cazabon

Image Lynn Cazabon

CIRCA Catalyst: Lynn Cazabon

Monday, October 26, 2015,
Noon – 1:00 PM, PAHB 216

Program:
Associate Professor Lynn Cazabon will discuss in-progress projects centered on the Baltic Sea, produced during her time as a Fulbright Scholar in Liepāja, Latvia earlier this year. Her work there focuses on the intimate and complex interconnection between the natural environment and the people who live within it and resulted in a series of portraits of Liepāja residents set against the Baltic Sea and displayed with a quote from each participant about the role the sea plays in their lives. A second series of works focuses on the Baltic Sea itself and the aftermath of military operations that have occurred there. Professor Cazabon will also speak generally about her experiences living and teaching in a foreign country in the New Media Program at Liepāja University.

 

Catalyst FlierImageCropped

UMB – UMBC CIRCA Catalyst: Dr. Bruce Jarrell and Lee Boot
Monday, May 18, 2015

UMB Health Sciences and Human Services Library, Gladhill Boardroom, 5th Floor, 601 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

This Catalyst event marked the debut of a cooperative series produced with the UMB Council for the Arts & Culture. UMB-UMBC Catalyst events will showcase the growing ideas and partnership sown between UMB and UMBC researchers.

Lee Boot, Associate Research Professor and Associate Director at the Imaging Research Center presented his commissioned Dome Explorer iPad app created for the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Bruce Jarrell the Chief Academic and Research Officer at UMB presented on his metalsmithing and impressive projects  that currently beautify UMB and its ceremonial events. In 2012, Jarrell teamed up with Ukrainian blacksmith Anatoliy Rudik to create a metalwork art piece that fills two second floor windows of the University’s Southern Management Corporation Campus Center. The treelike piece is based upon the Davidge Elm, a majestic tree that before its death a decade ago stood for nearly 200 years outside Davidge Hall.

 

FallonSmallCIRCA Catalyst: Michael Fallon and Jenny O’Grady
Wednesday, April 15, 2015    

UMBC Senior Lecturer and poet Michael Fallon set himself the task of writing a book of poems inspired by his own spontaneous photographs taken on walks with his wife. UMBC Director of Marketing Jenny O’Grady edits The Light Ekphrastic, a quarterly journal that pairs writers and artists from all over the world to create new works online and for public spaces. In March of 2015 O’Grady paired sixty-six Baltimore-area writers and artists for a special edition of The Light Ekphrastic published online and via the Baltimore LED Art Billboard. She discussed some of the many routes her participants took as they went from being strangers to collaborators.

 

CIRCA Catalyst: Stephen Bradley and Lisa CellaBradleyCella_LightInEachOne
Wednesday, March 25, 2015

UMBC Associate Professors Stephen Bradley, Visual Arts and Lisa Cella, Music presented on their recent collaborative “deep-listening – deep seeing” performance, combining video projection and flute performance. Steve Bradley’s time-lapse video work explored a meditative perspective that featured quotidian events. Bradley’s visual “curiosity of motion” was interwoven with contemporary solo flute works composed for, and performed by, Lisa Cella.

 

Maryland Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts

September 25
Noon – 1:00 PM
Location: Fine Arts 558 (South Elevator)
Free, catered event, with good vegetarian options

Professional Practice Presentation:

Much to the chagrin of artists, there are legal implications to making creative work. This applies to amateurs and professionals alike in all mediums of expression. The minute that you put paint to canvas, or sine wave to hard drive, or light to celluloid, copyright gets involved. This can be a good thing because copyright strengthens your ability to protect and profit from your creative expressions. Similarly, whenever you collaborate with other artists, get a commission from a patron, or take on some independent contractor work, an oral or written contract is likely lurking around the corner. Contracts help humans figure out exactly what their wants, needs, and expectations are for any particular scenario. During this talk, we will cover introductory legal issues related to copyright and contracts, and we will discuss how these two areas of the law relate to your work as an artist.


Bio: Adam Holofcener, Esq.
is the Executive Director of Maryland Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, a non-profit organization that provides pro bono legal services and education to Maryland based artists and arts organizations. In his legal practice, Adam counsels artists and musicians on matters of copyright, trademark, contract, business entity formation, constitutional law, and other issues. He teaches a seminar on Art and Media Law at the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law. Adam is also a practicing musician and sound artist. Information related to his creative endeavors can be found at www.adamgholofcener.com. He is a dad who lives in Baltimore City, USA.

Curating Your Digital Identity Faculty ADVANCEment Workshop
Monday, February 23, 2015 · Noon – 1 PM

In a recent article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, Kelli Marshall, Lecturer at DePaul University cautions that “an online search for academics without strong digital identities almost always yields two initial results: first, the name of the institution or department, and, second, their webpage on Rate My Professors. While the latter is not inherently bad news for all academics, many will likely cringe at what’s written about them there, whether justified or not.”

A digital identity in academia is important, yet, many people struggle to find time to keep it up to date. A panel of faculty will lead a discussion on the importance of maintaining a digital identity, as well as provide tips, insights, examples, and success stories for managing your digital identity.

Panelists include:

Theodosia Gougousi, Associate Professor, Physics

Jennie Leach, Associate Professor, Chemical, Biochemical, and Environmental Engineering

Christine Mallinson, Associate Professor, Language, Literacy, and Culture

Renetta Tull, Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Student Development

 

CODE OF BEST PRACTICES IN FAIR USE FOR THE VISUAL ARTS

Friday, March 27 1:00 PM – 2:00 PMFairUse

Location: ITE 456

This is a “brown bag” event, please bring your own lunch – CIRCA will provide complementary beverages.

Want to know more about fair use in the visual arts? Have questions about how you can use fair use in your work? Join the lead principal investigators of CAA’s new Code of Best Practices in the Visual Arts, Patricia Aufderheide, university professor in the School of Communication at American University and Peter Jaszi, professor of law in the Program on Information Justice and Intellectual Property at American University’s Washington College of Law, for a series of webinars offering in-depth tutorials on the Code.

The series will include the following topics:

  1. An Introduction to CAA’s Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for the Visual Arts
  2. Fair Use in Scholarship
  3. Fair Use in Teaching and Art Practice
  4. Fair Use in Museums and Archives
  5. Fair Use in the Visual Arts: A Review

The first webinar in the series will take place on Friday, March 27, 2015, from 1:00 to 2:00 PM (EST). Registration is free and open to the public thanks to a generous grant form the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Dates for the remainder of the series will be announced soon.

 

Liz Lerman Workshop facilitated with CIRCA Director Tim Nohe
Liz Lerman describes the Critical Response Process

Liz Lerman describes the Critical Response Process

April 29, 2015   |   5:00 – 7:00 PM

Dance Technology Studio, PAHB 231 with a catered reception on The Terrace, PAHB

The Critical Response Process was facilitated by Liz Lerman and Tim Nohe, and included a collaborative “deep-listening – deep seeing” performance, combining video projection by Stephen Bradley and flute performance by Lisa Cella.

Steve Bradley’s time-lapse video work explored a meditative perspective through quotidian visual events. By slicing time into precise visual moments, the video presented the listener/viewer with an illuminated focus on the familiar. Interweaving Bradley’s video was a solo alto flute composition by Stuart Saunders Smith, interpreted by Lisa Cella.  This collaboration engaged our capacity for deep listening and seeing, and drew out CRP insights.

Participants in the Critical Response Process Workshop used the processes that Liz Lerman shared to give direct responses to Professors Cella and Bradley as they sought to inform and refine their collaborative performance.

The informal meal was presented in the garden setting of the Terrace and encouraged discussions of research and collaboration through a simple performance guided by winding a red thread around a finger. As the thread was wound, speakers described a project that particularly excited them. Listeners provided feedback.

Liz Lerman convening her CRP workshop

Liz Lerman convening her CRP workshop