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2020

Friday September 11, 12 noon – 12 midnight, Vimeo Livestream
Meet the Artists, 6pm, Zoom
A collaboration between a photographer, a composer, and an audio engineer

Dan Bailey’s Observatories series renders photographs with an expanded sense of time. It attempts to slow down to observe, reflect, and record landscapes – a rhythm that is more on a geologic time scale. The images presented in Dream Prayer Observatory are from one camera view on the southern coast of Tasmania taken over a period of 3 months.

Composer Linda Dusman began to study the Paganini Caprices in response to a request from violinist Airi Yoshioka for a new solo work. At the same time, the plight of children in the Mideast immigrating with their families drew her to listen to an Arabic lullaby, which used a similar mode to the 6th Paganini Caprice. The combination in Dream Prayer Lullaby ultimately became three-fold: a dream of a peaceful integration of peoples as they are forced from one land to another, a prayer that this dream might be realized, and a lullaby to comfort the children who suffer and wait.

Alan Wonneberger recorded and spatialized Airi Yoshioka’s performance Dream Prayer Lullaby as the audio component of Dream Prayer Observatory. Convolution reverb places the violin in the Great Pyramid, while the work slowly “migrates” in stereo space.

This 12-hour limited release of the piece serves as a fundraiser for the following non-profits devoted to improving the quality of life for children and the planet:

UNICEF for child refugees and migrants

Retriever Essentials – to support UMBC students in need

Kids Rights

Friends of the Earth

Anti-Racism and Action: Our Roles Now
Third Drop-In Session:  Health Disparities and COVID-19

Friday September 11th at 1:00 P.M.

The Dresher Center for the Humanities, Center for Social Science Scholarship, Center for Innovation, Research, and Creativity in the Arts and the Imaging Research Center invite you to attend the third Anti-Racism and Action: Our Roles Now Drop-in Session on Friday September 11th at 1:00 P.M. to consider how we can continue to use our roles as faculty, staff, teachers, chairs/directors, graduate students, or mentors to work toward racial justice, social change, civic action, community action, and pedagogical engagement. This session follows the momentum started in the first two Anti-Racism and Action sessions held on June 12 and July 24. The focus of this session will be a conversation about Health Disparities and COVID-19. COVID-19 is yet another phenomenon where people experience tragic neglect and mistreatment that reveal structural inequities caused by racist systems. In this Drop-In Session we will discuss research efforts by faculty to help policymakers and other stakeholders see how the dynamics of a racialized society produce such deleterious effects. In addition to specific projects, we will orient discussion toward further defining the unique and critical role university-based research can have in meeting the challenges or the pandemic.

Anti-Racism and Action: Our Roles Now
Second Drop-in Session: Monuments
Friday, July 24, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Online

The Dresher Center for the Humanities, Center for Social Science Scholarship, and Center for Innovation, Research, and Creativity in the Arts invite you to attend the second Anti-Racism and Action: Our Roles Now Drop-in Session on Friday July 24th at 1:00 P.M. to consider how we can continue to use our roles as faculty, teachers, chairs/directors, graduate students, or mentors to work toward racial justice, social change, civic action, community action, and pedagogical engagement. This session follows the momentum started in the first Anti-Racism and Action session held on June 12. We will discuss how we can continue anti-racism work on our campus and in our communities as we transition from summer to the fall semester. One focus of this session will be a discussion of memorials, including the removal of monuments in Baltimore and across the country, from the perspective of art history, African American history, and social justice. We will also consider potential ways to carry the work forward by partnering with local schools.

Stacy Wolf: Beyond Broadway: The Pleasure and Promise of Musical Theatre in America

UMBC Theatre Department, CIRCA and the Dresher Center for the Humanities
Wednesday, March 11th, 4:00 p.m.
PAHB 216

Stacy Wolf, Princeton University professor of theater in the Lewis Center for the Arts and director of the new Program in Music Theater will discuss her book Beyond Broadway: The Pleasure and Promise of Musical Theatre in America The idea of American musical theatre conjures up images of bright lights and big city, but its lifeblood is found in local and amateur productions. Wolf considers the widespread presence and persistence of musical theatre in U.S. culture, and examines it as a live, pleasurable, participatory experience. The talk will conclude with an interview featuring members of the UMBC Musical Theatre Club. This event is cosponsored by the UMBC Theatre Department, CIRCA and the Dresher Center for the Humanities.

Professor Wolf is a musical theatre scholar devoted to queer identity and feminism in performance, She has written Changed for Good: A Feminist History of the Broadway Musical (Oxford University Press, 2011), A Problem Like Maria: Gender and Sexuality in the American Musical (University of Michigan Press, 2002), and co-edited The Oxford Handbook of the American Musical (with Raymond Knapp and Mitchell Morris, 2011). She has published articles on theatre spectatorship, performance pedagogy, and musical theatre in many journals including Theatre Journal, Modern Drama, and Camera Obscura and was a former editor of Theatre Topics: A Journal of Pedagogy and Praxis. She has worked as a director and dramaturg.

CIRCA and UMBC’s Department of Visual Arts presents a lecture by celebrated artist Krzysztof Wodiczko – an artist renowned for large-scale slide and video projections on architectural facades and monuments. He has realized more than 90 of such public projections and installations in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, England, Turkey, Germany, Holland, Northern Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Poland, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States. Since the late 1980s, his projections have involved the active participation of marginalized and estranged city residents. Simultaneously, and also internationally (England, Finland, France, Poland, Holland, Japan, Northern Ireland, Spain, Sweden and the US) he has been designing and implementing a series of nomadic instruments and vehicles with homeless, immigrant, and war veteran operators for their survival and communication.