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MICHAEL RAKOWITZ

Wednesday, March 4, 2015 | 7:00 PM  | Location PAHB 132

http://michaelrakowitz.com/projects/

Enemy Kitchen, Michael Rakowitz

Enemy Kitchen, Michael Rakowitz

Michael Rakowitz discusses his work in the context of hope and antagonism, and at the intersection of problem solving and trouble-making. Rakowitz’s interventions in urban spaces extend from paraSITE (1998 – ongoing) in which the artist builds inflatable shelters for homeless people that attach to the exterior vents of a building’s HVAC system to Minaret (2001 – ongoing) in which access is gained to rooftops, in Western cities, from which the Islamic call to prayer is sounded. In Spoils (2011) Rakowitz made a culinary intervention at New York City’s Park Avenue restaurant by inviting diners to eat traditional Iraqi dishes on plates looted from Saddam Hussein’s personal collection. In a related culinary-art project, titled Enemy Kitchen (2012), Rakowitz devised a food truck that served Iraqi cuisine to Chicago’s public, manned by veterans of the Iraq War working under Iraqi refugee chefs.

Rakowitz’s work is featured in major private and public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Neue Galerie, Kassel, Germany; Smart Museum of Art, Chicago; Van Abbemuseum, Endhoven, Netherlands; British Museum; Kabul National Museum, Afghanistan; and UNESCO, Paris. Rakowitz is the recipient of a six prestigious awards from international foundations, most recently, a 2012 Louis Tiffany Foundation Award.

 

 

BEN ALLISON, JAZZ BASS, WITH THE UMBC JAZZ ENSEMBLEbenallison01-small

Friday, March 13 | 7:30 PM
Ben Allison, jazz bass, with the UMBC Jazz Ensemble
Concert Hall, Performing Arts and Humanities Building

As part of the Department of Music’s Jazz Festival, award-winning bassist and composer Ben Allison performs a concert of his music with the UMBC Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Matt Belzer.

Ben Allison is one of a few band leaders working in jazz today who has developed his own instantly identifiable sound. Known for his inspired arrangements, inventive grooves and hummable melodies, he draws from the jazz tradition and a range of influences from rock and folk to 20th century classical and world music traditions, seamlessly blending them into a cinematic, cohesive whole.

With his groups The Ben Allison Band, Man Size Safe, Peace Pipe, and Medicine Wheel, Allison has toured extensively throughout North America, Europe, and Brazil, winning fans and building new audiences with an adventurous yet accessible sound and a flair for the unexpected.

 

 

A STIRRING SONG SUNG HEROIC: AFRICAN AMERICANS FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM, 1619 TO 1865, PHOTOGRAPHS BY WILLIAM EARLE WILLIAMS

Interior, Fort Morgan, Battle Site, Mobile Bay, Alabama, 2003

January 26 – March 25
A Stirring Song Sung Heroic: African Americans from Slavery to Freedom, 1619 to 1865, Photographs by William Earle Williams
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery

The history of American slavery is considered in A Stirring Song Sung Heroic, an exhibition of 80 black and white silver gelatin prints by photographer William Earle Williams. These images document mostly anonymous, unheralded, and uncelebrated places in the New World—from the Caribbean to North America—where Americans black and white determined the meaning of freedom. Archives of prints, newspapers, and other ephemera related to the struggle accompany the work.

The presentation of this exhibition marks the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which abolished slavery nationwide following the conclusion of the American Civil War.

 

 

The CIRCA banner photo illustration based on work by Assistant Professor Corrie Parks